Marriner’s Lookout, Apollo Bay

It was a still, cold and misty day at Apollo Bay yesterday. For much of the day a thin band of cloud sat just below Marriner’s Lookout (750′ above sea level). I thought it worth a walk up to the lookout in case there was a view out to sea over the top of the layer of cloud, a spectacular sight which I have seen on just a few occasions. But today was not such an occasion. However, I did arrive at the lookout just as the mist began to dissipate.

Views from Marriner’s Lookout

View to the west. There are areas of untouched temperate rainforest in some of these gullies.
View to the east. The small coastal settlement of Skenes Creek is visible in the centre of the image. Cape Patton is on the horizon. The mist was lingering in all the gullies and valleys.
View to the south east. Apollo Bay harbour and Point Bunbury appearing as the mist cleared. There is a fishing boat about to enter the harbour mouth.

Superb fairy-wren

Superb fairy-wren (male). While much of the land around Marriner’s Lookout is cleared, there is some that isn’t and it supports a wide variety of native bird life. There were quite a few of these male superb fairy-wrens flitting around the area. Only occasionally would one sit long enough to be photographed. I published photos and some info about the superb fairy-wren in an earlier post on this blog:
https://southernoceanblog.com/2020/08/06/the-aire-river-mouth/

The horse paddock just behind the lookout

These two horses in the paddock behind the lookout area enjoy uninterrupted panoramic views over the ocean from Cape Patton to Marengo. Unbidden, they strolled across their paddock to greet me, even though I was facing away from them taking a few photos. The barbed wire didn’t seem to bother them. But the top strand of wire had an unexplained clump of wool on it, visible in the photo, which got me thinking. Sheep are not that tall, and there were none in the paddock. There was nothing else in the paddock growing wool. Had a sheep with ambitions for a life beyond the paddock and the plate cleared the fence after a good run up with a wild and woolly ovine version of the Fosbury flop or perhaps a western roll, leaving this tuft of wool as the only clue as to his escape? I hope so.
The horses were quiet and engaging. This one put his head over the fence and nuzzled my chest. He seemed to welcome being patted and rubbed. I didn’t expect this close encounter of the very friendly kind. We had a bit of a chat. I think we got on well.
The horse on the right was the one that was most sociable with me.
They seemed to be good mates, and this mutual nuzzling session went on for quite a while.
Beautiful warm and intelligent animals up close. I thoroughly enjoyed this unanticipated encounter. I once had a job which involved learning to ride (sort of) through long hours on horseback mustering cattle in unfenced bushland. Strong memories returned as I stroked the warm coat of this beautiful strong creature. I’d all but forgotten that pleasant horse smell, and the wonder of such a strong and large creature gently giving and accepting close contact as I stroked him and gave him a bit of a rub around his ears.

Pied Currawong

This bird looked as though it was born cranky. It was feeding, but let me know that my presence nearby was not welcome at all. I was in fact at some distance, as this shot was taken with a telephoto lens.
When I didn’t depart, he stopped eating to direct all his energy to indicating just how unwelcome I was. That is quite a glare.
The intensified glare, the frown and the cocked head finally did the trick. I got the message and moved on. The robust hooked beak visible here is one of the features which distinguishes the pied currawong from the grey currawong which is similar in size and colouring (it is dark grey) and has the same bright yellow eyes.

Red wattlebird

Adult red wattlebird upside down and feeding in the trees lining Milford Creek, which flows from the foothills near Marriner’s Lookout to the ocean.
After feeding upside down, without changing position it took off by simply letting go of the slender branch it had been on. It dived straight down for a short distance then levelled out and flew off.
The red wattlebird was sharing this gum tree with a sleepy well-fed and very round koala.

Koala dozing in a gum tree on the banks of Milford Creek

Arms folded, a full belly, safe and secure in the fork of these branches and sleeping peacefully.

7 thoughts on “Marriner’s Lookout, Apollo Bay

  1. I have observed and felt the pied currawong’s glare when I threw the ball, inside, for Ruby’s fetching pleasure. It wasn’t amongst my greatest moments of acuracy. Having been piffed only just a little too hard it missed the open draw and landed on the jewelry with a thud and jingle.
    The currawong’s glare was accompanied with several belts and cussing.

    Liked by 1 person

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